Lindsey Shapiro, PhD, science writer —

Lindsey earned her PhD in neuroscience from Emory University in Atlanta, where she studied novel therapeutic strategies for treatment-resistant forms of epilepsy. She was awarded a fellowship from the American Epilepsy Society in 2019 for this research. Lindsey also previously worked as a postdoctoral researcher, studying the role of inflammation in epilepsy and Alzheimer’s disease.

Articles by Lindsey Shapiro

Healiva and C4U to team up on new gene editing therapy for EB

Healiva and C4U will collaborate to develop a next-generation gene editing therapy — focusing on new technology to correct gene mutations — for epidermolysis bullosa (EB) patients, who are sometimes known as butterfly children for their fragile skin. Combining C4U’s expertise in gene editing technology and Healiva’s…

Case report describes 4 children with EB and airway ills

Airway involvement is a rare but burdensome and life-threatening manifestation of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) that requires prompt and proper management, according to a recent case report. Researchers in Saudi Arabia described four children with EB who were brought to their clinic showing involvement of their larynx, or voice box,…

Pilot Study Will Test APR-TD011 Wound Spray for EB

A pilot trial will investigate the effects of antimicrobial spray APR-TD011 on bacterial colonization in the wounds of people with epidermolysis bullosa (EB), the therapy’s developer, Relief Therapeutics, announced. The treatment’s active ingredient is hypochlorous acid, a chemical with strong and broad-acting antimicrobial properties. It is approved and…

Metabolites Linked to Nourishment, Inflammation Altered in RDEB

Patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) had distinct blood metabolic profiles compared with healthy people, a study showed. The most significantly altered molecules were amino acids — the building blocks of proteins — most of which were at lower levels in RDEB patients and correlated with disease severity.

Hsp70 Autoantibodies Elevated in EBA, May Contribute to Disease

Self-reactive antibodies against the stress-induced heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) were higher in the blood of patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), a study found. In a corresponding mouse model, the researchers observed the autoantibodies contributed to a worse disease course, likely through the mediation of inflammatory pathways. “This…